Lady Gaga's 'Government Hooker' starts out with a high, almost-operatic vocal; it reminds us of when the also-daring Gwen Stefani utilized 'the Lonely Goatherd' yodeling from 'The Sound of Music' on 'Wind It Up' from her second solo album 'The Sweet Escape.'

Gaga's usage of such an ethereal vocal is so unconventional -- but that's what we expect from her. Nevertheless, 'Government Hooker' quickly launches into a techno beat that embeds itself into the song's foundation and repeats itself throughout, until the fade out.

"I can be good, if you just wanna be bad / I can cool, if you wanna be mad / I can be anything, I'll be your everything, just touch me baby / I don't wanna be sad" are some of Gaga's most pleading and vulnerable lyrics, as she sings over machine-like beats that gnash against one another. The collision of Gaga's warm and breathy vocals over the hardened, processed beats works, and this is one of the most techno songs she has ever released.

Despite the title, 'Government Hooker' is not a political manifesto; it's a Lady Gaga dance song that's not nearly as disco-leaning as her title track, 'Born This Way.' It is, however, one of her most aggro and electro-pop tracks to date, as she's not afraid to interact passionately with the synthetic beats. She sells it like a lady of the night, that's for sure.

The hook -- no pun intended -- comes when Gaga sings "As long as I'm your hooker" four times, with the emphasis on the second syllable. "Hooookaaaaaah" is as silly sounding as it is fun. We can just imagine little monsters emulating their Mother Monster when they sing this song in cars or the shower.

The song also throws in a reference to John F. Kennedy and drinking her tears. The lyrical thinking is not linear and can be confusing, but don't analyze it. Just dance, to borrow a phrase from Gaga's last album.

'Government Hooker' should get a--es moving on the dancefloor, but it is not the best song on 'Born This Way.'

Listen to Lady Gaga, 'Government Hooker'