The 1975 frontman Matt Healy has no filter, and his controversial comments have landed him in hot water before -- from imploring Justin Bieber to "stop talking about nothingness" to admitting he'd feel "emasculated" dating a powerful woman like Taylor Swift. But despite attempts at clarification and recognizing he has a tendency to overshare, Healy shows no signs of slowing his verbal roll, and he recently implied pop-rock band 5 Seconds of Summer are nothing more than a manufactured fad.

"One of the things that I love about The 1975 is now I’ve realized that we’re kind of this gateway band. Gateway bands used to exist, but they were normally sh---ty — you know, bands that straddled between the truly alternative scene and the mainstream market. A soft, easy band for the kids to transition from the Backstreet Boys to f---in’ Cannibal Corpse or whatever it may be," Healy said during an in-depth MTV profile published today (June 22).

"With us, of course we’re gonna get a lot of kids who were into, I don’t know, 5 Seconds of Summer. And then they get inside and they realize: I can stay here. I can grow with this band. This isn’t a faddy thing. This isn’t the Backstreet Boys. You’re not being told to like us.”

Despite the fact that 5SOS write the majority of their own music, Healy's throwaway reference to the band is likely meant to invoke ideas of manufactured, all-appealing pop music with little substance -- an aspect of the current pop climate that he takes major issue with.

"The reason we reference the ‘80s so much, it’s not because of particular bands or particular songs. It’s because it was a time when pop music wasn’t so encumbered with self-awareness and fear and cynicism," he said. "I know that pop music existed where [there were] records like So by Peter Gabriel and Tango in the Night by Fleetwood Mac — amazing records that could almost be considered as supermarket favorites, but also really credible, forward-thinking pieces of work."

"That doesn’t really exist as much anymore," Healy continued. "Pop music now, if it’s massive on the charts, is tarnished with a lack of credibility, or a sense of that. Because, fair enough, there’s a lot of sh---, and people don’t know what they’re allowed to like. It’s really difficult to see in pop music what’s a genuine expression and what’s just something that’s a commercial statement. The thing with pop music, with me, the only question I allow myself is: Well, do you believe it?”

Guess he doesn't believe 5SOS?

Head over to MTV to check out Healy's full interview, where he talks (reverently) about The 1975's largely female fan base, his perceived pretension and his feelings about the internet.

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