Psychic Sylvia Browne may have predicted the coronavirus over a decade ago.

Before her death in 2013, the famed author released a book called End of Days: Predictions and Prophecies about the End of the World in 2008, which possibly foresaw the spread of COVID-19 12 years before it happened. (As of right now, the virus and has killed at least 4,639 and infected 126,344 globally.)

In an excerpt that has gone viral on social media, Browne warns of a global respiratory illness — similar to pneumonia — that would spread in 2020 before "suddenly" vanishing.

"In around 2020 a severe pneumonia-like illness will spread throughout the globe, attacking the lungs and the bronchial tubes and resisting all known treatments," she wrote. "Almost more baffling than the illness itself will be the fact that it will suddenly vanish as quickly as it arrived, attack again ten years later, and then disappear completely."

It's important to note that Browne has not been 100 percent correct in all her predictions, however, the illness she describes does sound eerily similar to the coronavirus and she did get the timing right.

The book passage even caught the attention of Kim Kardashian, who shared it with her millions of social media followers. "Kourtney just sent this to our group chat," the reality star wrote.

So was it just a lucky guess or a prediction?

On Wednesday (March 11), actor Tom Hanks revealed he and his wife Rita Wilson are the first celebrities to test positive for the coronavirus after experiencing flu-like symptoms in Australia.

"Hello, folks. Rita and I are down here in Australia. We felt a bit tired, like we had colds, and some body aches. Rita had some chills that came and went. Slight fevers too," he wrote on Instagram. "To play things right, as is needed in the world right now, we were tested for the Coronavirus, and were found to be positive.

"Well, now. What to do next?" Hanks continued. "The Medical Officials have protocols that must be followed. We Hanks’ will be tested, observed, and isolated for as long as public health and safety requires. Not much more to it than a one-day-at-a-time approach, no?"