Beverley Rose has been planning her funeral for the past five years.

According to the The Mirror, the 75-year-old self-described "forward planner" wants to alleviate her loved ones' stress when her time comes.

"Who knows how long I'll last … I'm pretty healthy at the moment, but you can never tell. [Turning] 70 made me think about it — your friends start dying, and you start going to more funerals than you do weddings," Rose shared.

"I know very much what I want, and it's slightly unusual, so I think I should let my kids know. Basically, I want the cheapest possible way to get rid of the body. I'd go in a bin liner," she joked, noting she's opted for the cheapest coffin and funeral arrangements.

"I don't want anyone there, then about three months later, I want a big party. Hopefully, one or two people will say nice things, and they'll all get really drunk. I want people to think, 'God, she was jolly good fun, and she's gone out the way she's lived her life,'" Rose said, revealing that her final wish includes lots of music and heavy drinking.

Rose decided to organize her funeral because she's "fairly selfish" and "doesn't want anyone else mucking up the plans."

"When my dad died, when we tried to organize his funeral, it was a nightmare. Plus, when my husband died, it was awful," she shared, adding that her biggest concern isn't her casket, but rather the guest list for her funeral.

"How would my kids know who to invite? They don't know who I went to school with when I was 20," Rose said.

Rose has been organizing her funeral with Legacy of Lives, a London-based online portal which helps users record their final wishes as well as compile passwords and login details for any account someone's loved ones might need access to after they die.

"I think the logistics of death are a nightmare. If you don't plan it, you leave newly sad people with a pile of admin," Rose said. "When it comes to life, my advice is live it. Live your life and make sure people don't need to pick up the mess after you're gone."

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